Thursday, 24 November 2016

Global Integrity 22

Christian Missional Integrity 
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World


Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****
Integrity in Christian Mission

Your throne, God, shall last forever and ever,
your royal sceptre is a sceptre of integrity;
virtue you love as much as you hate wickedness.
Psalm 45:6-7 (cited in Hebrews 1:8-9)

This entry features excerpts from the opening and closing parahgraphs in the Introduction to Serving Jesus with Integrity: Ethics and Accountability in Mission (2010), edited by Dwight Baker and Douglas Hayward. This book's sixteen chapters cover a wide range of important topics realted to integrity, collectively addressing some of the challenges, inconsistencies, guidelines, and virtuous examples that are all intertwined in Christian mission (protestant). It is organized into six parts. Integrity in: 1. Message, Finances, Relationships; 2. Personal Morality; 3. Insitutional Practice; 4. the Field; 5. Recrutment and Representation; and 6. Intentional Accountability. 

My take-away: Misisional integrity, like integrity in any area of work (e.g., business, humanitarian, education, politics), is founded upon personal integrity. And personal inegrity is founded upon moral wholeness.

“But ethical formulations and ethical instruction in themselves are not sufficient. Viewed simply as adherence to rules, ethics falls short. Even apart from our human penchant for evading or overstepping rules, we simply cannot manufacture rules enough…We need to be changed, to become new creatures, if our practice is to change fundamentally….” (p. xii)

“Ethical reflection is never finished. It is an ongoing discussion. In reaching for the ultimate, we are always enmeshed in and struggle with the penultimate, where we need careful thought, consultation with peers and fellow followers of Jesus, and guidelines if we are to make our way reliably and with integrity. As products of mature ethical reflection, codes, and guidelines are useful implements…assisting us in becoming people 'whose faculties have been trained by practice to distinguish good from evil' (Heb. 5:14 NRSV).” (p. xviii)

Applications
--In additon to the "human penchant for evading or overstepping rules," how is integrity affected by the human propensity to lie (intentionally, unconsciously and everything mixed in between), as well as to slant perspectives, memories, and issues in order to cast oneself in a favorable light or avoid scrutiny?

--"We need to be changed..."  Sounds good. But how does this happen?

--What do you do to practically help make your way "reliably and with integrity" in life and in life's challenging ethical situations? 

Saturday, 12 November 2016

Global Integrity 21

Christian Integrity 
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World


Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****
Perspectives from the Lausanne Movement
Cape Town Commitment 2010

Let us strive for a culture of full integrity and transparency.
We will choose to walk in the light and truth of God,
for the Lord tests the heart and is pleased with integrity.
Part 2, IIE. 4

The Lausanne Movement is a major umbrella organization-network of Christians and Christian organizations that was formed over 40 years ago. It is evangelical in its orientation and “connects influencers and ideas for global mission, with a vision of the gospel for every person, an evangelical church for every people, Christ-like leaders for every church, and kingdom impact in every sphere of society.More on its history here:https://www.lausanne.org/about-lausanne

This entry features excerpts from the Lausanne Movement’s Cape Town Commitment (2010). These excerpts call Christians to live with the highest levels of integrity and to resolutely prevent and confront corruption. They also emphasize the dire consequences to the credibility and witness of the church when Christians do not do so. The Movement has about 35 different “networks," with one of them being an “Integrity and Anti-Corruption Network.” This Network has convened meetings over the past few years with a major meeting planned in early 2017. 

PART ONE
7. We Love God’s World
“C.  Such love for the poor demands that we not only love mercy and deeds of compassion, but also that we do justice through exposing and opposing all that oppresses and exploits the poor. ‘We must not be afraid to denounce evil and injustice wherever they exist.’[30] We confess with shame that on this matter we fail to share God’s passion, fail to embody God’s love, fail to reflect God’s character and fail to do God’s will. We give ourselves afresh to the promotion of justice, including solidarity and advocacy on behalf of the marginalized and oppressed...”

9. We Love the People of God
“B) Love calls for honesty. Love speaks truth with grace. No one loved God’s people more than the prophets of Israel and Jesus himself. Yet no one confronted them more honestly with the truth of their failure, idolatry and rebellion against their covenant Lord. And in doing so, they called God’s people to repent, so that they could be forgiven and restored to the service of God’s mission. The same voice of prophetic love must be heard today, for the same reason. Our love for the Church of God aches with grief over the ugliness among us that so disfigures the face of our dear Lord Jesus Christ and hides his beauty from the world – the world that so desperately needs to be drawn to him.”

PART TWO
7. Truth and the Public Arenas
“B) Corruption is condemned in the Bible. It undermines economic development, distorts fair decision-making and destroys social cohesion. No nation is free of corruption. We invite Christians in the workplace, especially young entrepreneurs, to think creatively about how they can best stand against this scourge.”

IID. Discerning the will of Christ...
3. Christ-Centered Leaders
“The rapid growth of the Church in so many places remains shallow and vulnerable, partly because of the lack of discipled leaders, and partly because so many use their positions for worldly power, arrogant status or personal enrichment. As a result, God’s people suffer, Christ is dishonoured, and gospel mission is undermined…”

“B) We renew our commitment to pray for our leaders. We long that God would multiply, protect and encourage leaders who are biblically faithful and obedient. We pray that God would rebuke, remove, or bring to repentance leaders who dishonour his name and discredit the gospel. And we pray that God would raise up a new generation of discipled servant-leaders whose passion is above all else to know Christ and be like him.”

“C) Those of us who are in Christian leadership need to recognize our vulnerability and accept the gift of accountability within the body of Christ. We commend the practice of submitting to an accountability group.”

IIE. Calling the Church of Christ Back to Humility, Integrity and Simplicity
“B) Since there is no biblical mission without biblical living, we urgently re-commit ourselves, and challenge all those who profess the name of Christ, to live in radical distinctiveness from the ways of the world, to ‘put on the new humanity, created to be like God in true righteousness and holiness.’ “

1. Walk in Distinctiveness, as God’s New Humanity
“…The Bible shows that God’s greatest problem is not just with the nations of the world, but with the people he has created and called to be the means of blessing the nations….When there is no distinction in conduct between Christians and non-Christians – for example in the practice of corruption and greed, or sexual promiscuity, or rate of divorce, or relapse to pre-Christian religious practice, or attitudes towards people of other races, or consumerist lifestyles, or social prejudice – then the world is right to wonder if our Christianity makes any difference at all. Our message carries no authenticity to a watching world.”

4. Walk in Integrity, Rejecting the Idolatry of Success
"We cannot build the kingdom of the God of truth on foundations of dishonesty. Yet in our craving for ‘success’ and ‘results’ we are tempted to sacrifice our integrity...Let us strive for a culture of full integrity and transparency. We will choose to walk in the light and truth of God, for the Lord tests the heart and is pleased with integrity."

Applications
--The Cape Town Commitment points out in many places the failure of the church, Christians, and Christian leaders to act with integrity. Give a specific, recent example of how this has happened and the consequences.
--How would you desicribe the components of "a full culture of integrity" as emphasized in the final excerpt above? List a few practical ways to help foster this culture.

Sunday, 30 October 2016

Global Integrity 20

Philanthropic Support for Integrity
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World

φιλανθρωπία
philanthropy: the love of humanity

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****

John Templeton Foundation
In this entry we feature the Templeton Foundation. If you look into the types of research and initiatives that the Foundation is funding, you will find a grouping (among many) that relates directly to integrity. See examples in the list of projects below--preceded by information on the Foundation’s mission, core funding areas, and a short video on character virtue development.

The Templeton Foundation seeks to do philanthropic work with integrity and among other areas, to support the study and development of integrity through its philanthropy.

Mission
“The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the Big Questions of human purpose and ultimate reality. We support research on subjects ranging from complexity, evolution, and infinity to creativity, forgiveness, love, and free will. We encourage civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians and between such experts and the public at large, for the purposes of definitional clarity and new insights.”

Core Funding Areas
In the charter establishing his Foundation, the late Sir John Templeton set out his philanthropic intentions under several broad headings. These Core Funding Areas continue to guide our grant making as we work to find world-class researchers and project leaders to share in our pursuit of Sir John’s dynamic, contrarian, forward-looking vision. A number of topics—including creativity, freedom, gratitude, love, and purpose—can be found under more than one Core Funding Area. The Foundation welcomes proposals that bring together these overlapping elements, especially by combining the tools and approaches of different disciplines.”

Science and the Big Questions is the largest of our Core Funding Areas. We support a broad range of programs focused on the universal truths of character development and on the roots of good character in human nature, whether understood from a scientific, philosophical, or religious point of view….”

Video on Funding Character Virtue Development (3.5 minutes)

Seven Funding Examples Related to Integrity (via the site’s search engine):
The Emory Integrity Project: Integrating and Assessing an Integrity Initiative in University Education and Student LifeThe Emory Integrity Project (EIP) is an ambitious plan to transform university culture by establishing integrity as a constant narrative theme in the undergraduate experience. Integrity is a complex idea, but for our purposes reflects 1) a capacity for critical reflection and analysis of the values and ethical considerations in a given moral situation; 2) a practical skill set to determine and implement moral courses of action; and 3) the fortitude to withstand moral scrutiny and pressures to conform. Teaching integrity is a pedagogical challenge in the university setting. The EIP will draw from the literature and expertise on integrity formation in college-aged students, and employ Emory’s history of integrity-based programs, to design and implement campus-wide initiatives and programs to reimagine and refocus Emory’s undergraduate experience. Using curricular and co-curricular strategies, the EIP employs three primary virtues (and many associated virtues) to examine integrity: 1) humility (an affectational posture towards oneself and others characterized by other-regard and a recognition of one’s own imperfections and limitations of knowledge and affect); 2) honor (an affectively and cognitively based capacity to select and apply moral values to moral actions); and 3) helpfulness (an interest in and willingness to assist others in fostering their goals, interests, and aims).”

A Planning Grant for the Achieving with Integrity Project: Early Stage Stage Development of Core Components “The proposed one-year planning grant is to support the early stage development of the Achieving with Integrity (AwI) project, which aims to apply the principles of “reconstructive” character education (Menezes & Campos, 2000) to promote students’ moral awareness, judgment, commitment and action related to academic integrity…”

Leading from Your Spark: A Life of Virtue and Integrity “This project will support the gathering of approximately 30 young people (ages 15-17, equivalent grades of 9-11) from different parts of the world (including potentially, England, China, Russia and the Bahamas) and the United States at Sewanee: The University of the South for a youth leadership summit from June 20, 2012 to June 24, 2012 in association with the Foundation’s anniversary events in Tennessee. The goals of the youth summit are to stimulate and equip participants to identify and tap their own “spark” to make a difference regarding an issue or concern about which they are passionate, introduce participants to 21st Century collaborative leadership strategies and skills, engage participants in a practical project that stimulates growth and learning while also preparing them for leadership in their own schools and communities, and create a supportive learning community among diverse participants that can be sustained beyond the event via social media.”

Increasing Scientific Openness and IntegrityAn academic scientist’s professional success depends on publishing. Publishing norms emphasize novel, positive, tidy results. As such, disciplinary incentives encourage design, analysis, and reporting decisions that maximize publishability even at the expense of accuracy. This challenges scientists' character because professional success is enhanced by pursuing suboptimal scientific practices. As such, disciplinary norms guide researchers toward practices that are contrary to personal and scientific values. The end result is inflation of error in published science, and interference with knowledge accumulation. Scientific integrity can be improved with strategies that make the fundamental but abstract accuracy motive—getting it right—competitive with the more tangible and concrete incentive—getting it published.”

Exploring the Role of Virtues in Determining Organizational Culture: A Planning ProposalOrganizational culture has been well researched. But the ethical culture of organizations—what we call the “culture of integrity”—remains relatively unexamined. This project is important because the time is right, the Institute’s cumulative work to date will inform our findings, and we strongly believe that integrity underpins organizational culture. This revised application is for a one-year planning grant to begin to determine the role of virtues within organizations. Specifically, are there core virtues critical to the ethical operation of an organization? Can these be identified, studied, and re-combined to create a model for a culture of integrity? To answer these questions, we propose to update our review of the literature, identify best-practice examples of ethical organizations, profile select organizations, and synthesize our findings. Based on this work, we hope to develop a hypothesis on the role of virtues in determining organizational culture and a proposal for researching that hypothesis. We expect to find that virtues are important in creating positive cultures, to identify those virtues most critical to that end, and to gather evidence for proposing a cultures-of-integrity model.”

Honesty - Building a Virtuous CycleFrom plagiarism, to infidelity, to financial fraud, dishonesty seems to be a universal part of the world we live in. This not only affects our sense of security and comfort, but also discourages innovation and growth at the personal, professional, and societal level. We have spent the last few years exploring this topic through the (Dis)Honesty Project and a number of different initiatives: the documentary feature film “(Dis)Honesty – The Truth About Lies,” a traveling installation called the Truth Box, and the project’s digital properties including its own website. We aim to broaden the project’s impact by extending its educational work and creating targeted wraparound programming that engages individuals around the topics of honesty, integrity, and trust in the contexts of their lives. The programs encourage character development through dialogue, demonstrations, and periodic reminders. With the support the John Templeton Foundation, we will a) provide licenses for our film and its complementary curriculum to schools and universities who otherwise could not afford them; b) produce talkback discussions around the film for professional associations that initiate meaningful exploration of dishonesty and ethical culture within particular industries; and c) create and test a new approach to ethics training in organizational settings that facilitates discussions around dishonesty and provides periodic, consistent reminders to strengthen an ethical culture. Through these programs, we can help individuals develop, value, and maintain an honest, virtuous character and establish mechanisms and precedents that support this endeavor, ultimately creating a virtuous cycle that advances honesty, integrity and trust in the communities in which we live and work.”

Planning Grant: A New, Holistic Paradigm for Undergraduate STEM Education: Inspiring Big Questions by Cultivating Virtuous ScientistsAs universities have become more professionalized, a need has emerged to establish mechanisms to restore open inquiry in science education. There is also a need to provide an experience that exceeds the perceived limits of human thought while fostering the boundless creativity and dynamism made possible by human imagination and intellect. Through this planning grant, we will develop a three-year implementation project to establish a new STEM educational experience that will cultivate a habit of open-minded inquiry, develop those virtues needed for substantive intellectual progress, and equip students with the tools needed to actively create rather than passively absorb knowledge.”

Two Previous Funding Examples
Positive Psychology Center, University of Pennsylvaniahttps://www.templeton.org/what-we-fund/grants/positive-psychology-research
--“Description: These grants helped to establish the Positive Psychology Center. Positive Psychology is the study of the strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to thrive. The Center promotes research, training, and education. The field of Positive Psychology is founded on the belief that people want to lead meaningful and fulfilling lives, to cultivate what is best within themselves, and to enhance their experiences of love, work, and play.
--Grant Amount: $2,199,500   Start Date: January 2001  End Date: August 2007”

Center for Christian Thought, Biola University
--“Description: Though there are a multitude of Christian scholars in different fields working on the Big Questions – those questions of perennial human concern about how we should live, what is real, what is beautiful, what is good – there are few resources in the Christian academic world for enabling interdisciplinary, collaborative work on these questions, and fewer yet for translating such scholarship into formats accessible to a broader, non-academic audience. Biola University's Center for Christian Thought (CCT) will capitalize on this opportunity with the following main activities: Residential Fellowships and visiting-scholar appointments to facilitate sustained, interdisciplinary, collaborative research; Three RFPs, each focused on a timely Big Question; Dedicated staff and web resources for the translation of this scholarship to broad non-academic audiences; Yearly interdisciplinary conferences; Pastor-in-residence program and regular pastors; luncheons; Annual course-development competition; Public lectures and accessible resources translating scholarly work on the Big Questions to broad, non-academic audiences; Well-designed and well-networked website that will feature the work of the Center Expected outputs and outcomes include: 12 book manuscripts, 36 journal articles, 3 edited volumes, 3 special-theme journal issues, 135 conference-paper submissions, 12 podcasts, 30 brief video interviews, 6 new courses developed, 12 multi-view papers, 6 sermon series; 65 emerging and established scholars networked, 3 conferences, 600 pastor-attendees at 3 pastors' luncheons, 6 senior-scholar public lectures with 600 attendees. Plausible enduring impacts include: Increased emphasis on interdisciplinary approaches to the Big Questions among Christian scholars; Decreased anti-intellectualism in evangelical Christian culture; Significant progress in knowledge concerning our three focal themes.
--Grant Amount: $3,029,221   Start Date: July 2012   End Date: June 2015”


Thursday, 13 October 2016

Global Integrity 19

Public Integrity
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World


Image source: Watchdog RI website
http://watchdogri.org/

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****

Center for Public Integrity
https://www.publicintegrity.org/

This entry focuses on "public integrity" which we define as the right and responsibility of citizens to join together in order to monitor, promote, and protect integrity in its communities, institutions, and governments. We share one example of a USA-focussed organization that we have heard about although not connected with personally (e.g., to better understand its emphases/orientations). The quotes below are from the organization's website.

"The Center for Public Integrity was founded in 1989...[and is one of the USA's] oldest and largest nonpartisan, nonprofit investigative news organizations and winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for investigative journalism. Our mission: To serve democracy by revealing abuses of power, corruption and betrayal of public trust by powerful public and private institutions, using the tools of investigative journalism....The Center’s editorial staff consists of journalists, [Freedom of Information Act] experts, copy editors, researchers, fact-checkers and data experts who work on the Center’s investigative projects and stories. The Center distributes its investigations through its award-winning website and to all forms of media; broadcast, print, online, and blogs, around the globe."

"The Center...focuses its investigations on the following areas: money and politics, government waste/fraud/abuse, the environment, healthcare reform, national security and state government transparency.  We have won more than 50 major journalism awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the George Polk Award and numerous honors from the Investigative Reporters and Editors, the Online News Association, Overseas Press Club, Society of Environmental Journalists and the Society of Professional Journalists."

Applications
--Have a look at the Center's website. What is one area in particular that interests you?
--How is this type of public service-integrity center present in other countries besides the USA? It would be good to see a list! 

Wednesday, 28 September 2016

Global Integrity 18

Creation Integrity
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World


Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****

‘Creation Integrity” refers to the wholeness and health of the world—nature--of which humans of course are part. It requires humans having integrity at all levels (global integrity) in order to preserve the integrity of the earth. Here are seven items/quotes over the past 25 years that deal with this important topic: our integrity for creation integrity. Some also represent movements that have merged and morphed into other earth-ecological emphases. Note: See also World Day of Creation  on 1 September--short video message from Desmond Tutu

World Council of Churches (written in early 1990s, quote from website)
“Over the years, an emerging conviction that justice, peace and creation are bound together has found expression in such World Council of Churches' study and action programmes as the Just, Participatory and Sustainable Society (JPSS), the conciliar process for Justice, Peace and the Integrity of Creation (JPIC) and…the Theology of Life (TOL) programme. The quest, in the 1970s, for a "just, participatory and sustainable society" was a response to growing recognition of the persistence of poverty and misery and of the limits of and threats to the earth's capacity to sustain human life. Between its sixth (1983) and seventh (1991) assemblies, the WCC appealed to the churches to make public commitments and undertake common action on the threats to life in the areas of justice, peace and integrity of creation as part of the essence of what it means to be the church. Since 1991, this effort has centred on articulating a "theology of life".  In a series of 22 case studies, local groups from around the world have examined one of ten affirmations made by a 1990 world convocation on JPIC, and have sought to understand both what it implied in their own context and how these local elements fit into a global analysis. These programmes, each of which built on the insights of its predecessor, sought to encourage the churches to make costly commitments to justice, peace and creation. They also sought to identify and make the connections visible, and to encourage churches to keep them in mind when addressing justice, peace and creation issues.”

World Council of Churches (current, quote from the website)
“The WCC has a long tradition of addressing the links between Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation. Today, this approach is applied and updated in regard to some of the most urgent global challenges. The WCC work on eco-justice is implemented through the Ecumenical Water Network, the Climate Justice project and the Poverty, Wealth and Ecology project.

Eco-justice – what is that? The “eco” prefix comes from the Greek word oikos for “house” and is part of the etymological roots of economy and ecology, but also ecumenism. In linking environmental and social justice issues the environmental justice approach, “eco-justice” in short, challenges both humanity’s destruction of the earth and the abuse of economic and political power which result in poor people having to suffer the effects of environmental damage.”

Pope Francis (2016)
“13. The urgent challenge to protect our common home includes a concern to bring the whole human family together to seek a sustainable and integral development, for we know that things can change. The Creator does not abandon us; he never forsakes his loving plan or repents of having created us. Humanity still has the ability to work together in building our common home. Here I want to recognize, encourage and thank all those striving in countless ways to guarantee the protection of the home which we share. Particular appreciation is owed to those who tirelessly seek to resolve the tragic effects of environmental degradation on the lives of the world’s poorest. Young people demand change. They wonder how anyone can claim to be building a better future without thinking of the environmental crisis and the sufferings of the excluded.

14. I urgently appeal, then, for a new dialogue about how we are shaping the future of our planet. We need a conversation which includes everyone, since the environmental challenge we are undergoing, and its human roots, concern and affect us all. The worldwide ecological movement has already made considerable progress and led to the establishment of numerous organizations committed to raising awareness of these challenges. Regrettably, many efforts to seek concrete solutions to the environmental crisis have proved ineffective, not only because of powerful opposition but also because of a more general lack of interest. Obstructionist attitudes, even on the part of believers, can range from denial of the problem to indifference, nonchalant resignation or blind confidence in technical solutions. We require a new and universal solidarity. As the bishops of Southern Africa have stated: “Everyone’s talents and involvement are needed to redress the damage caused by human abuse of God’s creation”. All of us can cooperate as instruments of God for the care of creation, each according to his or her own culture, experience, involvements and talents.”

Earth Charter Initiative (2000, current)
 “The Earth Charter Initiative is a global movement of organizations and individuals that embrace
the Earth Charter and use it to guide the transition towards a more just, sustainable, and peaceful world.” (quote from website)

“We stand at a critical moment in Earth's history, a time when humanity must choose its future. As the world becomes increasingly interdependent and fragile, the future at once holds great peril and great promise. To move forward we must recognize that in the midst of a magnificent diversity of cultures and life forms we are one human family and one Earth community with a common destiny. We must join together to bring forth a sustainable global society founded on respect for nature, universal human rights, economic justice, and a culture of peace. Towards this end, it is imperative that we, the peoples of Earth, declare our responsibility to one another, to the greater community of life, and to future generations. Earth, Our Home Humanity is part of a vast evolving universe. Earth, our home, is alive with a unique community of life. The forces of nature make existence a demanding and uncertain adventure, but Earth has provided the conditions essential to life's evolution. The resilience of the community of life and the well-being of humanity depend upon preserving a healthy biosphere with all its ecological systems, a rich variety of plants and animals, fertile soils, pure waters, and clean air. The global environment with its finite resources is a common concern of all peoples. The protection of Earth's vitality, diversity, and beauty is a sacred trust. (excerpt from Preamble)

Ecological Integrity [4 of the 16 Principles in the Charter]
--5. Protect and restore the integrity of Earth's ecological systems, with special concern for biological diversity and the natural processes that sustain life.
--6. Prevent harm as the best method of environmental protection and, when knowledge is limited, apply a precautionary approach.
--7. Adopt patterns of production, consumption and reproduction that safeguard Earth's regenerative capacities, human rights and community well-being.
--8. Advance the study of ecological sustainability and promote the open exchange and wide application of the knowledge acquired.”

Earth Day Network (quote from website)
“Earth Day Network’s mission is to broaden and diversify the environmental movement worldwide and to mobilize it as the most effective vehicle to build a healthy, sustainable environment, address climate change, and protect the Earth for future generations. Growing out of the first Earth Day, Earth Day Network is the world’s largest recruiter to the environmental movement, working with more than 50,000 partners in 196 countries to build environmental democracy. We work through a combination of education, public policy, and consumer campaigns.

The first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, activated 20 million Americans from all walks of life and is widely credited with launching the modern environmental movement. The passage of the landmark Clean Air ActClean Water ActEndangered Species Act and many other groundbreaking environmental laws soon followed. Twenty years later, Earth Day went global, mobilizing 200 million people in 141 countries and lifting environmental issues onto the world stage. More than 1 billion people now participate in Earth Day activities each year, making it the largest civic observance in the world.”

United Nations (2015) (excerpt below from text of the agreement)
“The Parties to this Agreement,
--Being Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, hereinafter referred to as "the Convention"
--…being guided by its principles, including the principle of equity and common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in the light of different national circumstances….
--Emphasizing the intrinsic relationship that climate change actions, responses and impacts have with equitable access to sustainable development and eradication of poverty,
--Recognizing the fundamental priority of safeguarding food security and ending hunger, and the particular vulnerabilities of food production systems to the adverse impacts of climate change,
--Taking into account the imperatives of a just transition of the workforce and the creation of decent work and quality jobs in accordance with nationally defined development priorities,
--Acknowledging that climate change is a common concern of humankind, Parties should, when taking action to address climate change, respect, promote and consider their respective obligations on human rights, the right to health, the rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, migrants, children, persons with disabilities and people in vulnerable situations and the right to development, as well as gender equality, empowerment of women and intergenerational equity,
--Recognizing the importance of the conservation and enhancement, as appropriate, of sinks and reservoirs of the greenhouse gases referred to in the Convention,
--Noting the importance of ensuring the integrity of all ecosystems, including oceans, and the protection of biodiversity, recognized by some cultures as Mother Earth, and noting the importance for some of the concept of "climate justice", when taking action to address climate change,
--Affirming the importance of education, training, public awareness, public participation, public access to information and cooperation at all levels on the matters addressed in this Agreement,
--Recognizing the importance of the engagements of all levels of government and various actors, in accordance with respective national legislations of Parties, in addressing climate change,
--Also recognizing that sustainable lifestyles and sustainable patterns of consumption and production, with developed country Parties taking the lead, play an important role in addressing climate change,

Have agreed as follows:” [29 Articles, 27 pages]

United Nations (2015)
“This Agenda is a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity. It also seeks to strengthen universal peace in larger freedom. We recognise that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. All countries and all stakeholders, acting in collaborative partnership, will implement this plan. We are resolved to free the human race from the tyranny of poverty and want and to heal and secure our planet. We are determined to take the bold and transformative steps which are urgently needed to shift the world onto a sustainable and resilient path. As we embark on this collective journey, we pledge that no one will be left behind. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets which we are announcing today demonstrate the scale and ambition of this new universal Agenda….

--Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
--Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.
--Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
--Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss."
----------------
Applications
--Which of the above items would you like to study further?

Monday, 12 September 2016

Global Integrity 17

Executive Integrity
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World


Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.

Managing Executive Health is a co-authored book that takes a positive approach to the health of managers, executives, and business leaders. It emphasizes “physical vigor, psychological well-being, spiritual vitality, and ethical integrity. Here are some excerpts from chapter 10, Ethical Character. It is refreshing to see such a clear emphasis placed on leaders who can develop and act with integrity!

It is not enough [for leaders] to be physically, psychologically, and spiritually sound.  To complete the package, one must examine one’s character in order to ensure the optimal use of life. The final piece of the four-dimensional model, our character, can be developed and improved, just as our physical or psychological health can. (p. 177)

For our purposes, we define ethical character as personal integrity. Integrity is defined as “the state of being unimpaired; soundness or the quality or condition bring whole or undivided; completeness.” The individual is undivided in his or her fundamental beliefs and attitudes, presenting those values to everyone. (p. 178)

…someone with personal integrity is often required to take action against an issue that seems unjust or inequitable…The person cannot simply refuse to participate in the behaviors. A person with true integrity  must stand up for what he or she believes. (p. 178)

[Quoting others about personal character:] Who are you when no one is watching?…What is the right thing to do in this situation?’…What sort of person must I become to be able to do the right thing? (p. 183)

While character and personal integrity are important for everyone to possess, it is especially important for those individuals who affect the lives of others: the men and women who manage our organizations and become role models for people who work for them With people off true integrity running the major corporations, the world can only become a better place in which to live. (p. 192)

Managing Executive Health: Personal and Corporate Strategies for Sustained Success (2008), James Quick, Cary Cooper, Joanne Gavin, and Jonathan Quick

Applications
--List one help and one hindrance for developing greater integrity is executives and leaders.

--What do you think of the authors’ definition of integrity?

Friday, 26 August 2016

Global Integrity 16

Integrity Training
Moral Wholeness for a Whole World

Integrity = Accountability + Competence + Ethics - corruption
(Integrity Action's formula for integrity)


Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
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How do we train people for integrity? Integrity Action is an example of a civil society organization that is actively providing training in integrity. Their mission is to “empower citizens to act with and demand integrity.” “Integrity Action is an organisation and an active network of committed NGOs, universities and policy makers, working closely with governments, media organisations, businesses and our peers to identify ways of making integrity work in some of the worlds challenging settings.” (quotes from the website: http://integrityaction.org/)

Resources
--Closing the Loop: Empowering and Mobilising Communities (video, 6.5 minutes)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YleZveI-XoA

--Integrity Textbook (2015)
Integrity Action has taught integrity for over ten years in different contexts and with various audiences such as high-level government officials, academics as well as school students. Over the last few years, we have been asked many times to document our pioneering approach to making integrity work and produce a sourcebook that academics and students can refer to when teaching or studying integrity. The result is, in my opinion, an excellent textbook which we hope will equip you to live and work with integrity in all aspects of your life.” (page 2)

-- Integrity Clubs Manual (2016)
“This manual outline is the result of a joint effort of Community-based Organisations, educational experts and representatives of institutional agencies from DRC, Kenya, Nepal and Palestine, who met at a workshop hosted by Integrity Action in Jordan, from 22 to 25 February 2016. The outline in particular - and the workshop in general—was requested by some of Integrity Action’s partners who wished to establish Integrity Clubs in their communities. Integrity Action noticed that although examples of Integrity Clubs can be found in a number of countries, and guidelines are widely available, none of the current examples reflects what Integrity Action and its partners want to achieve: establishing student led clubs where members can learn - as well as practically apply - the concept of Integrity. This manual outline aims at developing Young Integrity Builders, by equipping them with skills and knowledge needed to be able to monitor projects and services in their communities using Integrity Action’s Community Integrity Building (CIB) approach.” (page 3)

Applications
--Interact with this quote below from the Integrity Textbook, regarding its underlying mission to build integrity as the means to and reduce corruption. (page 2).

“This is the underlying mission of Integrity Action–emphasizing the overarching role of building integrity as a means of reducing corruption. Integrity Action incorporates the original ideas of ethics, and joins this to accountability and competence as the fundamental way of combating corruption.

Integrity Action wants to re-balance the understanding of corruption - to build institutions and ways of working that proactively prioritise integrity as a bulwark against corruption, rather than spend time solely trying to act against instances of corruption. Integrity Action believes that there is a need to have and build strong and resilient societies that can resist the attractions of corruption, and can suggest and live with a better alternative - integrity.


This book starts with the personal perspective and builds on this foundation of personal integrity to how it can be applied to management in government, business or civil society. From this view of professional integrity, the book then moves onto building integrity within communities and society more generally.”

Monday, 8 August 2016

Global Integrity—15

Integrity Needs External Referents
Moral wholeness for a whole world



"Please don't go, please don't leave me alone.
A mirror is so much harder to hold."
Jon Foreman (click here for song and lyrics)

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
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Integrity needs external referents. Why? Because of the human propensity to self-justify and self-deceive. Integrity cannot just be based on only an inner sense of congruence—the sense of having aligned one’s values with one’s actions. Why? Because one’s values may not be entirely moral, and one’s perception of inner congruence may not be entirely accurate. So, trust yourself but do not completely trust yourself. We need external moral and accountability referents to hold up the mirror, to help us appraise our levels of integrity. See also the entry from 25 February 2016, Facing Ourselves.

We define integrity as living consistently in moral wholeness (an ideal). Practically, though,  it involves endeavoring to live consistently in moral wholeness (the day in and day out reality). Here are three additional areas to further strengthen living consistently in integrity.

Self-awareness
--I am aware that I am not always aware how I distort and bias my moral self-appraisals
--I do my best to admit mistakes and wrongdoing

External Morals
--I can clearly clarify the main external referents that guide my moral values and ethical principles
--I am committed to internalize and follow these moral values and ethical principles

External Accountability
--I entrust myself to specific people and processes for scrutiny and accountability
--I use resources to help me grow in integrity

Applications
--Which of the three areas above are you strongest in or weakest?
--How would you adjust or add to the items above? 

Thursday, 28 July 2016

Global Integrity14

Positive Psychology and Integrity
Moral wholeness for a whole world

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
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Positive Psychology is a relatively new field of psychology that has been rapidly growing over the past two decades. It focuses on the positive aspects of human personality (e.g., character strengths, virtue, and the heroic), personal fulfillment, and overall wellbeing. More recently it has been extending beyond the individual focus to also include social and community wellbeing. 

One of the most popular websites related to positive psychology is Authentic Happiness. This website includes a number of questionnaires which one can take online for free, after a short registration. One of the most popular questionnaires in the VIA Survey of Character Strengths. This survey looks at 24 character strengths (organized In terms of six broad virtues: wisdom, courage, humanity, justice, temperance and transcendence).

Where is integrity in the VIA Survey? The character strength of honesty is the closest equivalent to integrity. “Honesty [authenticity, integrity]: Speaking the truth but more broadly presenting oneself in a genuine way and acting in a sincere way; being without pretense; taking responsibility for one’s feelings and actions.” (https://www.viacharacter.org/www/Portals/0/Classification%202014.pdf).

Integrity as we define it though in these weblog entries, is considerably different. It is not simply “presenting oneself in a genuine way and acting in a sincere way” but rather endeavoring to live your life in a consistently moral way. Integrity in our view is a core, unifying characteristic of healthy (positive) human personality, functioning, and wellbeing. It is not a third level descriptor (i.e. 1. Virtues, 2. Character Strengths, 3. Descriptors). Arguably though, some aspects of integrity are embedded implicitly in other Character Strengths, such as Bravery and Perseverance.

Applications
--Go on the Authentic Happiness website and take the Character Strengths survey. What are your strengths? How do you rate in the strength of honesty?
----How might integrity be embedded implicitly in other aspect of the 24 Character Strengths?
(see descriptions HERE)
--See also: Entwistle, D. N., & Moroney, Stephen K. (2011). Integrative perspectives on human flourishing: The imago Dei and positive psychology. Journal of Psychology and Theology, 39(4), 295-303. (article overview HERE)

Tuesday, 12 July 2016

Global Integrity--13

Integrity in Professional Psychology
Moral wholeness for a whole world


 Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
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What does integrity look like in professional psychology? Here are three examples below. Integrity is a core value which influences the formation and practice of specific ethical principles. Perhap the "I" shape in the Greek psi letter above (psi is the universal symbol for psychology) can stand for the central place of "integrity" in professional psychology.

1. California Board of Psychology
"The mission of the Board of Psychology (Board) is to advance quality psychological services for Californians by ensuring ethical and legal practice and supporting the evolution of the profession. Our values are transparency, integrity, consumer protection, inclusiveness, excellence, and accountability." (California Board of Psychology, Spring Journal, 2016, p. 1)

2. American Psychological Association
“This section consists of General Principles. General Principles, as opposed to Ethical Standards, are aspirational in nature. Their intent is to guide and inspire psychologists toward the very highest ethical ideals of the profession….Integrity. Psychologists seek to promote accuracy, honesty and truthfulness in the science, teaching and practice of psychology. In these activities psychologists do not steal, cheat or engage in fraud, subterfuge or intentional misrepresentation of fact. Psychologists strive to keep their promises and to avoid unwise or unclear commitments. In situations in which deception may be ethically justifiable to maximize benefits and minimize harm, psychologists have a serious obligation to consider the need for, the possible consequences of, and their responsibility to correct any resulting mistrust or other harmful effects that arise from the use of such techniques.” (American Psychological Association, General Principles, Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, 2002/2010)

“…The Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists speaks to the common moral framework that guides and inspires psychologists worldwide toward the highest ethical ideals in their professional and scientific work…Psychologists are committed to placing the welfare of society and its members above the self-interest of the discipline and its members. They recognize that adherence to ethical principles in the context of their work contributes to a stable society that enhances the quality of life for all human beings….The Universal Declaration describes those ethical principles that are based on shared human values. It reaffirms the commitment of the psychology community to help build a better world where peace, freedom, responsibility, justice, humanity, and morality  prevail….The Universal Declaration articulates principles and related values that are general and aspirational rather than specific and prescriptive. Application of the principles and values to the development of specific standards of conduct will vary across cultures, and must occur locally or regionally in order to ensure their relevance to local or regional cultures, customs, beliefs, and laws….” (Preamble).

Principle III Integrity. Integrity is vital to the advancement of scientific knowledge and to the maintenance of public confidence in the discipline of psychology. Integrity is based on honesty, and on truthful, open and accurate communications. It includes recognizing, monitoring, and managing potential biases, multiple relationships, and other conflicts of interest that could result in harm and exploitation of persons or peoples. Complete openness and disclosure of information must be balanced with other ethical considerations, including the need to protect the safety or confidentiality of persons and peoples, and the need to respect cultural expectations. Cultural differences exist regarding appropriate professional boundaries, multiple relationships, and conflicts of interest. However, regardless of such differences, monitoring and management are needed to ensure that self-interest does not interfere with acting in the best interests of persons and peoples…”

Applications
--Identify one aspect of integrity that all three excerpts above have in common.

--Why are “monitoring and management…needed to ensure that self-interest does not interfere with acting in the best interests of persons and peoples…” (Universal Declaration)

Monday, 27 June 2016

Global Integrity--12

Integrity for Global Citizenship
Moral wholeness for a whole world


Integrity is central to our identity and responsibility
as global citizens.

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
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Excerpt: 

United Nations Department of Public Information/NGO Conference
Gyeongju, Republic of Korea 30 May – 1 June 2016

“In addition to literacy and numeracy, education must advance the cause of global citizenship which: promotes integrated development of the whole person emotionally, ethically, intellectually, physically, socially, and spiritually; imbued with an understanding of our roles, rights and responsibilities for the common good in service to humanity and the advancement of a culture of peace, non-violence, freedom, justice, and equality…“empowers learners to assume active roles to face and resolve global challenges and to become proactive contributors to a more peaceful, tolerant, inclusive, and secure world”[UNESCO 2014, reference in Applications below]; nurtures a sense of solidarity and empathy in order to end poverty, protect the planet, ensure human rights, and foster prosperous and fulfilling lives for all….We commit to…An education that teaches conflict resolution, a deep appreciation for diversity, ethical reasoning, gender equality, human rights and responsibilities, interdependence, multilingual and multicultural competence, social justice, sustainable development, and values.”

Global citizenship refers to our common humanity—our shared sense of identity and belonging as humans. It also refers to our shared sense of responsibility and rights as humans. Fundamental to global citizenship education is “the integrated development of the whole person” including “ethical reasoning…social justice...and values"(as the above quote states). 

Integrity is a core part of one’s identity and involvements as global citizens. We believe that integrity is both a character quality and a way of living that must be more explicitly emphasized in education for global citizenship (including “ethics” and “values” is not enough although it is certainly on the right track). Integrity is central to our identity and responsibility as global citizens. Global citizens are people of integrity.

You can watch a three minute overview-wrap up of the UN DPI/NGO conference here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5uppOnfdE0


Applications
--See also Global Citizenship Education: Preparing Learners for the Challenges of the 21st Century (UNESCO, 2014).