Monday, 8 August 2016

Global Integrity—15

Integrity Needs External Referents
Moral wholeness for a whole world



"Please don't go, please don't leave me alone.
A mirror is so much harder to hold."
Jon Foreman (click here for song and lyrics)

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****

Integrity needs external referents. Why? Because of the human propensity to self-justify and self-deceive. Integrity cannot just be based on only an inner sense of congruence—the sense of having aligned one’s values with one’s actions. Why? Because one’s values may not be entirely moral, and one’s perception of inner congruence may not be entirely accurate. So, trust yourself but do not completely trust yourself. We need external moral and accountability referents to hold up the mirror, to help us appraise our levels of integrity. See also the entry from 25 February 2016, Facing Ourselves.

We define integrity as living consistently in moral wholeness (an ideal). Practically, though,  it involves endeavoring to live consistently in moral wholeness (the day in and day out reality). Here are three additional areas to further strengthen living consistently in integrity.

Self-awareness
--I am aware that I am not always aware how I distort and bias my moral self-appraisals
--I do my best to admit mistakes and wrongdoing

External Morals
--I can clearly clarify the main external referents that guide my moral values and ethical principles
--I am committed to internalize and follow these moral values and ethical principles

External Accountability
--I entrust myself to specific people and processes for scrutiny and accountability
--I use resources to help me grow in integrity

Applications
--Which of the three areas above are you strongest in or weakest?
--How would you adjust or add to the items above? 

Thursday, 28 July 2016

Global Integrity14

Positive Psychology and Integrity
Moral wholeness for a whole world

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****

Positive Psychology is a relatively new field of psychology that has been rapidly growing over the past two decades. It focuses on the positive aspects of human personality (e.g., character strengths, virtue, and the heroic), personal fulfillment, and overall wellbeing. More recently it has been extending beyond the individual focus to also include social and community wellbeing. 

One of the most popular websites related to positive psychology is Authentic Happiness. This website includes a number of questionnaires which one can take online for free, after a short registration. One of the most popular questionnaires in the VIA Survey of Character Strengths. This survey looks at 24 character strengths (organized In terms of six broad virtues: wisdom, courage, humanity, justice, temperance and transcendence).

Where is integrity in the VIA Survey? The character strength of honesty is the closest equivalent to integrity. “Honesty [authenticity, integrity]: Speaking the truth but more broadly presenting oneself in a genuine way and acting in a sincere way; being without pretense; taking responsibility for one’s feelings and actions.” (https://www.viacharacter.org/www/Portals/0/Classification%202014.pdf).

Integrity as we define it though in these weblog entries, is considerably different. It is not simply “presenting oneself in a genuine way and acting in a sincere way” but rather endeavoring to live your life in a consistently moral way. Integrity in our view is a core, unifying characteristic of healthy (positive) human personality, functioning, and wellbeing. It is not a third level descriptor (i.e. 1. Virtues, 2. Character Strengths, 3. Descriptors). Arguably though, some aspects of integrity are embedded implicitly in other Character Strengths, such as Bravery and Perseverance.

Applications
--Go on the Authentic Happiness website and take the Character Strengths survey. What are your strengths? How do you rate in the strength of honesty?
----How might integrity be embedded implicitly in other aspect of the 24 Character Strengths?
(see descriptions HERE)
--See also: Entwistle, D. N., & Moroney, Stephen K. (2011). Integrative perspectives on human flourishing: The imago Dei and positive psychology. Journal of Psychology and Theology, 39(4), 295-303. (article overview HERE)

Tuesday, 12 July 2016

Global Integrity--13

Integrity in Professional Psychology
Moral wholeness for a whole world


 Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****
What does integrity look like in professional psychology? Here are three examples below. Integrity is a core value which influences the formation and practice of specific ethical principles. Perhap the "I" shape in the Greek psi letter above (psi is the universal symbol for psychology) can stand for the central place of "integrity" in professional psychology.

1. California Board of Psychology
"The mission of the Board of Psychology (Board) is to advance quality psychological services for Californians by ensuring ethical and legal practice and supporting the evolution of the profession. Our values are transparency, integrity, consumer protection, inclusiveness, excellence, and accountability." (California Board of Psychology, Spring Journal, 2016, p. 1)

2. American Psychological Association
“This section consists of General Principles. General Principles, as opposed to Ethical Standards, are aspirational in nature. Their intent is to guide and inspire psychologists toward the very highest ethical ideals of the profession….Integrity. Psychologists seek to promote accuracy, honesty and truthfulness in the science, teaching and practice of psychology. In these activities psychologists do not steal, cheat or engage in fraud, subterfuge or intentional misrepresentation of fact. Psychologists strive to keep their promises and to avoid unwise or unclear commitments. In situations in which deception may be ethically justifiable to maximize benefits and minimize harm, psychologists have a serious obligation to consider the need for, the possible consequences of, and their responsibility to correct any resulting mistrust or other harmful effects that arise from the use of such techniques.” (American Psychological Association, General Principles, Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, 2002/2010)

“…The Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists speaks to the common moral framework that guides and inspires psychologists worldwide toward the highest ethical ideals in their professional and scientific work…Psychologists are committed to placing the welfare of society and its members above the self-interest of the discipline and its members. They recognize that adherence to ethical principles in the context of their work contributes to a stable society that enhances the quality of life for all human beings….The Universal Declaration describes those ethical principles that are based on shared human values. It reaffirms the commitment of the psychology community to help build a better world where peace, freedom, responsibility, justice, humanity, and morality  prevail….The Universal Declaration articulates principles and related values that are general and aspirational rather than specific and prescriptive. Application of the principles and values to the development of specific standards of conduct will vary across cultures, and must occur locally or regionally in order to ensure their relevance to local or regional cultures, customs, beliefs, and laws….” (Preamble).

Principle III Integrity. Integrity is vital to the advancement of scientific knowledge and to the maintenance of public confidence in the discipline of psychology. Integrity is based on honesty, and on truthful, open and accurate communications. It includes recognizing, monitoring, and managing potential biases, multiple relationships, and other conflicts of interest that could result in harm and exploitation of persons or peoples. Complete openness and disclosure of information must be balanced with other ethical considerations, including the need to protect the safety or confidentiality of persons and peoples, and the need to respect cultural expectations. Cultural differences exist regarding appropriate professional boundaries, multiple relationships, and conflicts of interest. However, regardless of such differences, monitoring and management are needed to ensure that self-interest does not interfere with acting in the best interests of persons and peoples…”

Applications
--Identify one aspect of integrity that all three excerpts above have in common.

--Why are “monitoring and management…needed to ensure that self-interest does not interfere with acting in the best interests of persons and peoples…” (Universal Declaration)

Monday, 27 June 2016

Global Integrity--12

Integrity for Global Citizenship
Moral wholeness for a whole world


Integrity is central to our identity and responsibility
as global citizens.

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****
Excerpt: 

United Nations Department of Public Information/NGO Conference
Gyeongju, Republic of Korea 30 May – 1 June 2016

“In addition to literacy and numeracy, education must advance the cause of global citizenship which: promotes integrated development of the whole person emotionally, ethically, intellectually, physically, socially, and spiritually; imbued with an understanding of our roles, rights and responsibilities for the common good in service to humanity and the advancement of a culture of peace, non-violence, freedom, justice, and equality…“empowers learners to assume active roles to face and resolve global challenges and to become proactive contributors to a more peaceful, tolerant, inclusive, and secure world”[UNESCO 2014, reference in Applications below]; nurtures a sense of solidarity and empathy in order to end poverty, protect the planet, ensure human rights, and foster prosperous and fulfilling lives for all….We commit to…An education that teaches conflict resolution, a deep appreciation for diversity, ethical reasoning, gender equality, human rights and responsibilities, interdependence, multilingual and multicultural competence, social justice, sustainable development, and values.”

Global citizenship refers to our common humanity—our shared sense of identity and belonging as humans. It also refers to our shared sense of responsibility and rights as humans. Fundamental to global citizenship education is “the integrated development of the whole person” including “ethical reasoning…social justice...and values"(as the above quote states). 

Integrity is a core part of one’s identity and involvements as global citizens. We believe that integrity is both a character quality and a way of living that must be more explicitly emphasized in education for global citizenship (including “ethics” and “values” is not enough although it is certainly on the right track). Integrity is central to our identity and responsibility as global citizens. Global citizens are people of integrity.

You can watch a three minute overview-wrap up of the UN DPI/NGO conference here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5uppOnfdE0


Applications
--See also Global Citizenship Education: Preparing Learners for the Challenges of the 21st Century (UNESCO, 2014).

Monday, 13 June 2016

Global Integrity 11

Pro-Integrity
Moral wholeness for a whole world


We cannot talk about corruption without also talking about its antidote: integrity.

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****


“Corruption is at the heart of so many of the world’s problems. We must overcome it, if our efforts to end poverty, promote prosperity and defeat terrorism and extremism are to succeed. Today’s Summit has demonstrated the deep commitment of a significant number of countries, businesses and members of civil society to work together to tackle this scourge. To do this we will build on and implement existing international agreements – but also go much further, making this a top priority at home and abroad and building capacity to tackle the problem. We commit to expose corruption wherever it is found, to pursue and punish those who perpetrate, facilitate or are complicit in it, to support the communities who have suffered from it, and to ensure it does not fester in our government institutions, businesses and communities. We will fulfil our shared commitment to ‘substantially reduce corruption and bribery in all their forms’ [as stated in Sustainable Development Goal 16]."

Pro-integrity is a synonym for anti-corruption. It is also the antidote for corruption. It would be great if our anti-corruption efforts everywhere would include this term and prioritize it as a practice.

Corruption lies at the heart of every human (and not only at the heart of the world’s problems as per the quote above). This is a message that must be clearly acknowledged and shared. Without it, anti-corruption efforts miss the primary, predisposing, precipitating, and reinforcing causes of corruption. 

Likewise, the capacity for integrity resides in the heart of every human. This too must be emphasized. We cannot  talk about corruption without also talking about its antidote: integrity. To be anti-corruption is to be pro-integrity.

Watch the archive of the London Summit here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zsla0NoYXoM


Applications
--List a few ways to explicitly link pro-integrity with the anti-corruption discourse and efforts.
--How could this linkage be done in your settings and spheres of influence?


Tuesday, 24 May 2016

Global Integrity 10

Affirming Integrity...at all levels
Moral wholeness for a whole world
The integrity of the upright will guide them
but the falseness of the treacherous will destroy them.
Proverbs 11:3

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****

As shared in the previous entry, living in integrity is not being morally perfect. But it does involve: admitting mistakes and wrongdoing; acknowledging our propensity for…hypocrisy; trusting ourselves but not completely. And as this entry asserts, integrity involves finding ways to affirm our integrity: to build it and to safeguard it.

The excerpt below is from part two of a guest weblog I (Kelly) did recently for the CHS Alliance (24 February 2016; see the previous entry. The weblog entry was on Ten Psychological Tricks for Avoiding Accountability. Part two though was more positive in that it focused on ways for preserving and developing integrity. Click on the link in the previous sentence to access the entire entry including part two.

Affirming Integrity
"Here are five suggestions for developing the main tool that we have in our good practice arsenal: integrity…[Integrity is] the core quality and commitment that helps us align our stated values with our actual behaviours as we pursue consistent moral wholeness.

1. Yourself. Examine your accountability practices by reviewing this weblog entry. What are you aware of regarding your strengths and weaknesses? Can you give some specific examples?

2. Colleagues. Discuss this topic with colleagues. To what extent are and can colleagues be accountable with one another? Identify some personal, group, organisational and sectoral vulnerabilities...

3. Managers. Encourage management to consider how they express moral values in the workplace, especially reflecting on how one’s private morality can differ from one’s workplace morality. Crisis times...

4. Leaders. Model and mentor transparency and accountability as leaders. Admit mistakes. Welcome feedback from others.  Encourage colleagues to share “uncomfortable” information with you...

5. Ethos. Cultivate an organisational “culture of integrity”...Intentionally weave transparency and accountability into “how we do things:” our organisational thinking, strategies, polices, and procedures...

Applications
--Which of the five 'integrity affirmations' above would you like to explore more?
--Are there any specific applications for your life and/or work.? 


Saturday, 14 May 2016

Global Integrity 9

Hiding Hypocrisy
...at all levels

Moral wholeness for a whole world

Beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy.
Luke 12:1

Do you not know that a little leaven
leavens the whole lump of dough?

I Corinthians 5:6.

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.

*****

Integrity does not mean perfection. It does mean though that if one makes a mistake or does something wrong, then he/she is willing to acknowledge it, and as necessary apologize and make amends. So integrity at all levels involves a commitment to act with moral wholeness, realizing that one will fall short of the moral mark. It also means understanding that we may try to rationalize away our responsibility for our mistakes or wrongdoings: hypocrisy. Hypocrisy can trump integrity. And I think we are all guilty of this at times. So...we must trust ourselves to act with integrity, but not trust ourselves completely.

The excerpt below is from a guest weblog I (Kelly) did recently for the CHS Alliance (24 February 2016). The title is Ten Psychological Tricks for Avoiding Accountability. It could also be titled: Ten Tricks for Feigning Integrity or Ten Tricks for Hiding Hypocrisy.


Hiding Hypocrisy
“Here are ten tactics used to avoid accountability for mistakes, poor practice, dysfunction, and outright deviance…These tactics illustrate what not to do when we and our organisations are asked to give an account of our work - be it via routine self-assessments or requests to explain our actions. They can serve to minimise cognitive dissonance, to protect ourselves, or to intentionally misrepresent the facts. Understanding how we can get it wrong can be a helpful way to avoid some of these proven “tactical tricks” for avoiding accountability.

1. Delegate the matter to someone else internally - diffuse it, distance yourself from it - and do everything to avoid an internal and especially an independent review.

2. Avoid, reword, or repackage, the issues - obfuscate the facts, or at least talk tentatively or vaguely about some mistakes in the past and that you or someone could probably have done a better job on … but go no further; rationalise and/or disguise any culpability.

3. Focus on minor or “other” things so as to look like you are focusing on the central things, punctuating it all with the language of transparency and accountability."

Applications
--Have a look at all 10 Tricks. Are there any that apply to you?
--What do you think of the assertion that we can ' trust ourselves but not completely'?





Friday, 29 April 2016

Global Integrity 8

Corruption Connections
Moral wholeness for a whole world


EXPOSED Campaign
Why can't Grace go to school?https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=autlpiy2kE8

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****

"The EXPOSED Campaign, a coalition of Christian groups and churches from over 150 nations seeking to shine a light on corruption, is now officially concluded! Over the past two years, EXPOSED campaigned on corruption issues in all aspects of public life. Over 250,000 people took part in actions across the world to expose unethical practice. We'd like to thank everyone who got involved and especially to the nearly 150,000 people who signed our Global Call against Corruption which was presented to the leaders of the world's major economies, the G20 at it's November 2014 meeting in Brisbane, which marked the conclusion of the EXPOSED campaign. And although the campaign itself may have ended, the work to 'shine a light' on corruption continues ... in the lives and witness of the many thousands across the world who caught the vision of EXPOSED!" (excerpt from Facebook, 23 December 2014)

Applications
--Summarize in one or two sentences why Grace can't go to school, as presented in the video.
--Are there any implications for your life and integrity? If so, list a few.
--How could you get more information about "corruption connections?"

Monday, 11 April 2016

Global Integrity 7


Anti-Integrity
Moral wholeness for a whole world

Transparency International

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****

Corruption is the opposite of integrity.
It is moral decay. It is anti-integrity.
It’s not just them out there.
It is us. It’s time to wake up.


Applications
--Is corruption an all or noting thing, or is it on a continuum?
--Do we gradually slide into corruption or fall into it abruptly?

--How do we know if we are sleeping, or maybe even just sleepy, morally?
--How do people wake up? 

Tuesday, 29 March 2016

Global Integrity 6

The Global Charter of Conscience
Moral wholeness for a whole world


Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****

The word integrity does not appear once in the 2012 Global Charter of Conscience: A Global Covenant concerning Faiths and Freedom of Conscience. Nonetheless, the whole document is based upon and points us towards integrity—lifestyles of integrity which are committed to a “good world” by: acknowledging our deepest differences; embracing rights, responsibilities and respect; embracing freedom of thought conscience and religion; pursuing civility and a thriving public square; and being both citizens of the world and patriots of one’s own country. From our perspective, global civility and its core values, as emphasized in this Charter, requires global integrity. It is the best way to truly combat “global chaos.”
*****

The Global Charter of Conscience has been drafted and published by a group of followers of many faiths and none, politicians of many persuasions, academics and NGOs who are committed to a partnership on behalf of “freedom of thought, conscience and religion” for people of all faiths  and none. A growing number of academic studies and reports show that “freedom of thought, conscience and religion” is widely neglected and threatened today. A recent Pew Forum report, for instance, says that three quarters of the world’s population live in countries where there is a high degree of menace to their faith—sometimes through government repression, sometimes through sectarian violence, and sometimes through the mounting culture wars that we are now seeing in Western countries. In our global era, it is said that “everyone is now everywhere,” and that “living with our deepest differences” has become a massive global problem, especially when those differences are religious and ideological. This is a huge problem for the future of humankind that must be resolved.” (Quote from the Charter’s website)

A Global Covenant concerning Faiths and Freedom of Conscience
“Keenly aware of the titanic promise and peril of our time, as forms of global interconnectedness reach an unprecedented speed, scale, and scope across the earth, we issue and subscribe to this Charter to address a major world challenge whose resolution will be decisive for the cause of civilization and human flourishing. That is, we address the urgent problems raised by the challenge of “living with our deepest differences” when those differences involve core beliefs, worldviews, and ways of life, and when they are increasingly found within single communities, nations, and civilizations.

Our purpose is to set out a vision of the rights, responsibilities, and respect that will be the foundation of a civil and cosmopolitan “global public square,” and the habits of the heart for those who would be “citizens of the world” as well as patriots in their own countries, and so to advance the cause of a “good world” and thus of global civilization over against the forces of global chaos.”
(opening text of the Charter)
  
Applications
--Summarize the main point and purpose of the Charter in one sentence
--List a few applications for how you would want to live out the Charter with integrity.
--Read the Charter!


Monday, 14 March 2016

Global Integrity 5

The UN Global Compact
Establishing a Business Culture of Integrity
Moral wholeness for a whole world

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****

“The United Nations Global Compact is a United Nations initiative to encourage businesses worldwide to adopt sustainable and socially responsible policies, and to report on their implementation…Under the Global Compact, companies are brought together with UN agencies, labour groups and civil society. Cities can join the Global Compact through the Cities Programme. The UN Global Compact is the world's largest corporate sustainability(aka corporate social responsibility) initiative with 13000 corporate participants and other stakeholders over 170 countries with two objectives: "Mainstream the ten principles [see below] in business activities around the world" and "Catalyse actions in support of broader UN goals, such as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)"…The UN Global Compact…was officially launched at UN Headquarters in New York on July 26, 2000. (Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Global_Compact)

The Ten Principles of the UN Global Compact
Corporate sustainability starts with a company’s value system and a principled approach to doing business. This means operating in ways that, at a minimum, meet fundamental responsibilities in the areas of human rights, labour, environment and anti-corruption. Responsible businesses enact the same values and principles wherever they have a presence, and know that good practices in one area do not offset harm in another. By incorporating the Global Compact principles into strategies, policies and procedures, and establishing a culture of integrity [italics added for emphasis], companies are not only upholding their basic responsibilities to people and planet, but also setting the stage for long-term success.The UN Global Compact’s Ten Principles are derived from: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Labour Organization’s Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work, the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, and the United Nations Convention Against Corruption.

Human Rights
Principle 1: Businesses should support and respect the protection of internationally proclaimed human rights; and
Principle 2: make sure that they are not complicit in human rights abuses.

Labour
Principle 3: Businesses should uphold the freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining;
Principle 4: the elimination of all forms of forced and compulsory labour;
Principle 5: the effective abolition of child labour; and
Principle 6: the elimination of discrimination in respect of employment and occupation.

Environment
Principle 7: Businesses should support a precautionary approach to environmental challenges;
Principle 8: undertake initiatives to promote greater environmental responsibility; and
Principle 9: encourage the development and diffusion of environmentally friendly technologies.

Anti-Corruption
Principle 10: Businesses should work against corruption in all its forms, including extortion and bribery. (Excerpt from the website: https://www.unglobalcompact.org/what-is-gc/mission/principles)

See also (opening image, above):
Global Compact for the 10th Principle Corporate Sustainability with Integrity: Organizational Change to Collective Action (English) “A collection of cases from Global Compact companies and stakeholders around the world illustrating anti-corruption implementation efforts and the related dilemmas organizations face.” (Excerpt from: https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/151)

Applications
Integrity, and a culture of integrity, is needed to implement all 10 of the principles. How is such integrity cultivated, safeguarded, and evaluated? In what ways does integrity need to be personal and explicit in order for the Compact to be effective?

Thursday, 25 February 2016

Global Integrity 4

 Facing Ourselves
Moral wholeness for a whole world

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.

*****

Integrity is a way of being. It reflects the good in us, the positive side of human nature. It requires us to face up to our own strengths and weaknesses. It is nurtured through:

--a vigilant awareness of our human tendency toward self-deception and rationalization as well as our heroic aspirations to do good
--a virtuous humility to admit our vulnerability to not getting integrity right as well as for distorting and diluting our moral responsibilities
--a voluntary commitment to outside support and accountability from healthy friendships, organizations, and communities as well as relevant codes of ethics.
*****
“From the Armenian genocide at the dawn of the 20th century to the horrors of Darfur at the threshold of the 21st century, the human capacity for evil is as jilting as it is unfathomable. Even more disturbing is our calculated silence and rationalized inaction in response to such atrocities. The reality of evil and suffering, from the horrors of genocide to the darkness of our own hearts, is pervasive and perplexing....

Are we wired for self-deception? From a social psychology perspective, our need to calm cognitive dissonance [the disconcerting sense of disharmony between our ideal self and actual self] compels us to distort our memories, our motivations and our morality. Or, to paraphrase Walter Lippmann on a personal level, there can be no liberty for the individual who lacks the means by which to detect his or her own self-deceptions. So how do we pursue a virtuous life, how do we, in the words of Solzhenitsyn, recognize [in ourselves] “the line separating good and evil that passes through every human heart”? ... [We must] consider the challenge of personal responsibility and what may contribute to moral courage and everyday heroism or destructive inaction and self-justification in the face of evil and suffering.”

Facing Up to the Challenge of Evil and Suffering (2013), Friends of the Trinity Forum, Geneva-Genève. (Excerpts from the Introduction and Conclusion, Michèle Lewis O’Donnell, pp. 4, 33).


Applications
--How do you understand the potential for evil in yourself?
--What psychological framework or worldview informs your understanding?
--What practical safeguards do you have to discern and deal with self-deception?
--Give a personal example of ordinary heroism--the other and  more positive side of human nature.

Sunday, 14 February 2016

Global Integrity 3

We Have a Problem
Moral wholeness for a whole world

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.

*****
Leadership Qualities
Hubris for Humans or Humility for Humanity?
“We have a leadership problem!...The Lausanne Leadership Development Working Group was created to respond to [the] need for Christ-like leaders.  The working group [was] made up of a cross section of global senior leaders…many of whom are specifically involved in leadership development. We started with a survey of Christian leaders.  We asked them to tell us about their experiences with Christian leaders, what they thought Christ-like leadership should look like, and what they thought was most effective in building Christ-centered leaders.

We collected responses from 1,031 leaders from across seven continents.  Those surveyed included a wide range of ages, types of leadership experience and quantities of leadership experience.  Approximate one-third of those surveyed were women.  We conducted the survey in five languages to try to get a wide range of opinions. In the process of conducting the survey, one thing became frighteningly obvious—we have a leadership problem!” (quote from Lausanne website)

Some Survey Highlights 
“When asked to describe their worst experiences working under [Christian] leaders, and what characteristics those poor leaders had, 1,000 leaders answering the survey said:
Prideful, always right, and always the big boss
Lack of integrity, untrustworthy
Harsh, uncaring, refused to listen, critical

Slightly lower on the list:
Inability to manage people and enable them to work together
Spiritually immature, no evidence of holiness or prayerfulness
-----
“When 1,000 Christian leaders across the globe were surveyed, the top three ranking characteristics that described Christ-centered leadership were:
Integrity, authenticity, excellent character
Servant’s heart, humble
Spiritually mature, hears God’s voice, holy and prayerful

Next on the list came:
Excellent people management skills and ability to discern and develop the gifts of others
Biblical knowledge, theologically sound
Compassionate, good listener, more oriented to people than accomplishing the task”
-----
What would you say is the most frequent cause of failure in Christian leaders to ‘finish well’ as a Christ-centered leader in the nation where you are currently living?” Respondents could pick three answers.  Five of the ten possibilities received the vast majority of the votes.  The top five included:
Burn-out (360)
Abuse of power (360)
Inappropriate use of finances (354)
Inordinate Pride (353)
Lack of growth in their Spiritual Life (349)
The sixth cause ranked was “sexual sin” with 292 votes.”


Applications
--Are the findings in this survey relevant for leaders across sectors, countries, religious groups, etc.?
If so, how?

--List a few take aways for you from the survey results.

Saturday, 30 January 2016

Global Integrity--2

United Nations Personnel
Moral wholeness for a whole world
See images, information, and highlights of the UN: HERE.

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****

The United Nations has high expectations for its personnel. The “UN Core Competency Framework,” outlined below, describes the skills, attitudes, and behaviors that all UN staff are expected to have and to develop further. The Framework is organized into three categories: Core Values, Core Competencies, and Core Managerial Competencies. Integrity is the first of the three Core Values.
Source: UN Competency Development: A Practical Guide (2010)

--UN Core Values: integrity, professionalism, and respect for diversity.
--UN Core Competencies: communication, team work, planning and organization, accountability, creativity, client orientation, commitment to continuous learning, and technological awareness. 
--UN Managerial Competencies: leadership, vision, empowering others, building trust, managing performance and judgment, and decision-making.
Integrity
“The competency of Integrity is a core value for the United Nations: An ability to work honestly, openly, impartially and in accordance with the values of the United Nations is critical for all staff members. All staff members are required to demonstrate this value, irrespective of the nature of their role.

Positive Indicators
--Upholds the principles of the United Nations Charter.
--Demonstrates the values of the United Nations, including impartiality, fairness, honesty and truthfulness, in daily activities and behaviours.
--Acts without consideration of personal gain.
--Resists undue political pressure in decision-making.
--Does not abuse power or authority.
--Stands by decisions that are in the Organization’s interest even if they are unpopular.
--Takes prompt action in cases of unprofessional or unethical behaviour.”   (p.5)

Negative Indicators
--Interprets principles and ethics flexibly without justification.--Seeks personal gain.
--Compromises too readily when under pressure.
--Favors certain issues, individuals or groups in a subjective way.
--Not reliable.
--May be dishonest.” (p. 11)

Note: See also the integrity rating scales for Staff, Managers, and Managers of Managers (pp. 12-14).

Applications
Review the core values and competencies for United Nations personnel (see the above link for the fuller description, pp. 5-8). Identify some ways for further developing integrity in your work setting/life (see the “Suggested Development Activities” in the above Guide, pp. p. 15-18).

Saturday, 16 January 2016

Global Integrity--1


Definitions
Moral wholeness for a whole world
________
תֹּם

ακεραιότητα

integritas

 _________________________________

This is a world that is not seeing the best of human nature."
Margaret Chan, Director General of WHO, 12 November 2015
“The Sustainable Development Goals and the Game Change in Global Health”
Graduate Institute, Geneva

Integrity is moral wholeness—living consistently in moral wholeness. Its opposite is corruption, the distortion, perversion, and deterioration of moral goodness, resulting in the exploitation of people. Global integrity is moral wholeness at all levels in our world—from the individual to the institutional to the international. Global integrity is requisite for “building the future we want—being the people we need.” It is not easy, it is not always black and white, and it can be risky. These entries explore the many facets of integrity with a view towards the global efforts to promote sustainable development and wellbeing.
*****

Integrity. The basic meaning of the English word integrity is ‘whole, not divided’. It is related to the Latin word integer, which means a whole number, not divided into fractions. Integrity is about wholeness, completeness, consistency.

Tōm. The basic meaning of the Hebrew word tōm, translated ‘integrity’ in the Old Testament, is completeness, fullness. Nothing is missing. Nothing is deficient. Nothing is out of alignment.

Aphthoria. The meaning of the Greek word aphthoria, translated ‘integrity’ in the New Testament, is ‘morally sound, pure’, literally, ‘without corruption’. Integrity is in fact the opposite of corruption. To have integrity means to ‘have it all together’ morally….

To have integrity is to be consistent, to be complete, to be free from corruption, in both grace and truth. And that kind of life is good news to those who encounter us.”

David Bennett, Integrity, the Lausanne Movement, and a Malaysian Daniel, Global Analysis, 4(1) (January 2015, Lausanne Movement). Excerpts for pages 18-20.

ApplicationsConsider the definitions of integrity and global integrity above. Are there parts that you would you adjust or additional thoughts to add?